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Rhode Island Legislative News: Legislative Session Update

From shipping wine to selling cheese, a variety of bills are on the docket

By Sara Capozzi

A number of bills concerning the beer, wine and spirits industry and its associated operations are before the Rhode Island General Assembly this 2018 session. Bills before the General Assembly include direct-to-consumer wine shipping, licensing fees, alcohol server training, brew pub sales and more. A highlight of these bills as of press time are as follows:

Senate Bill No. 2107 would allow licensed wine producers, suppliers, importers, wholesalers, distributors and retailers who obtain a wine direct shipper license to ship up to 24 9-liter cases of wine directly through the mail to eligible customers in the state of Rhode Island. It was introduced on Jan. 11 and referred to Senate Special Legislation and Veterans Affairs. A hearing to discuss the bill was scheduled to take place on March 14.

Similarly, House Bill. No. 7777 would allow licensed wine producers, suppliers, importers, wholesalers, distributors and retailers who obtain a wine direct shipper license to ship up to 24 9-liter cases of wine directly through the mail to eligible customers in the state of Rhode Island. This bill also includes a Gift Basket License clause that would allow up to four bottles of wine to be sold in gift baskets and shipped by mail to eligible consumers in the state.

Senate Bill No. 2251 would reduce the alcoholic beverage manufacturing and wholesale licensing fee from $3,000 to $500. It was introduced Feb. 1 and referred to Senate Special Legislation and Veterans Affairs. A hearing to discuss the bill was scheduled to take place on March 14.

Similarly, House Bill No. 7092 would reduce the alcoholic beverage manufacturing and wholesale licensing fee from $3,000 to $500. It was introduced on Jan. 10 and referred to the House Finance Committee.

Senate Bill No. 2252 would require the department of business regulation to administer testing to certify alcohol server training. It would also prohibit online testing. It was introduced on Feb. 1 and referred to Senate Special Legislation and Veterans Affairs. A hearing to discuss the bill was scheduled to take place on March 14.

House Bill No. 7322 would place restrictions on the times during which caterers with a Class P alcoholic beverage license are able to serve alcohol. It was introduced on Jan. 26 and referred to the House Corporations Committee. On Feb. 13, the committee recommended the measure be held for further study.

House Bill No. 7364 would allow the holder of a brewpub manufacturer’s license to sell products directly to holders of Class B, Class B-V, and Class C licenses. It was introduced on Jan. 31 and referred to the House Corporations Committee. On Feb. 13, the committee recommended the measure be held for further study.

Senate Bill No. 2487 would give cities and towns the authority to exempt themselves from the prohibition against issuing alcoholic beverage licenses within 200 feet of a school or church. It was introduced on Feb. 15 and referred to Senate Special Legislation and Veterans Affairs. A hearing to discuss the bill was scheduled to take place on March 14.

House Bill No. 7672 would allow the addition of prepackaged cheeses to the items allowed for sale at Class A license holders premises in towns or cities of ten thousand (10,000) or more inhabitants. The bill was introduced and referred to House Corporations on Feb. 15.

The Rhode Island Beverage Journal will be following these bills throughout the legislative session and full bill texts can be found at http://www.rilin.state.ri.us/Pages/Default.aspx.

 

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